Active Ingredient History

NOW
  • Now
Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from glutamic acid and ammonia. It is the principal carrier of nitrogen in the body and is an important energy source for many cells. Supplemental L-glutamine's possible immunomodulatory role may be accounted for in a number of ways. L-glutamine appears to play a major role in protecting the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract and, in particular, the large intestine. During catabolic states, the integrity of the intestinal mucosa may be compromised with consequent increased intestinal permeability and translocation of Gram-negative bacteria from the large intestine into the body. The demand for L-glutamine by the intestine, as well as by cells such as lymphocytes, appears to be much greater than that supplied by skeletal muscle, the major storage tissue for L-glutamine. L-glutamine is the preferred respiratory fuel for enterocytes, colonocytes and lymphocytes. Therefore, supplying supplemental L-glutamine under these conditions may do a number of things. For one, it may reverse the catabolic state by sparing skeletal muscle L-glutamine. It also may inhibit translocation of Gram-negative bacteria from the large intestine. L-glutamine helps maintain secretory IgA, which functions primarily by preventing the attachment of bacteria to mucosal cells. L-glutamine appears to be required to support the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, as well as the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). It is also required for the maintenance of lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAK). L-glutamine can enhance phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. It can lead to an increased synthesis of glutathione in the intestine, which may also play a role in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosa by ameliorating oxidative stress. The exact mechanism of the possible immunomodulatory action of supplemental L-glutamine, however, remains unclear. It is conceivable that the major effect of L-glutamine occurs at the level of the intestine. Perhaps enteral L-glutamine acts directly on intestine-associated lymphoid tissue and stimulates overall immune function by that mechanism, without passing beyond the splanchnic bed. Glutamine is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance.   NCATS

  • SMILES: N[C@@H](CCC(N)=O)C(O)=O
  • InChIKey: ZDXPYRJPNDTMRX-VKHMYHEASA-N
  • Mol. Mass: 146.1445
  • ALogP: -1.34
  • ChEMBL Molecule:
More Chemistry
  • Mechanism of Action:
  • Multi-specific: Missing data
  • Black Box: No
  • Availability: Prescription Only
  • Delivery Methods: Oral
  • Pro Drug: No

Drug Pricing (per unit)

More Pricing Detail

Note: This drug pricing data is preliminary, incomplete, and may contain errors.

(2s)-2,5-diamino-5-oxopentanoic acid | (2s)-2-amino-4-carbamoylbutanoic acid | glutamic acid 5-amide | glutamic acid amide | glutamine | l-2-aminoglutaramic acid | l-2-aminoglutaramidic acid | levoglutamide | l-glutamic acid γ-amide | l-glutamin | l-glutamine | l-(+)-glutamine | l-glutaminsäure-5-amid | nutrestore | q | (s)-2,5-diamino-5-oxopentanoic acid

Feedback

Data collection and curation is an ongoing process for CDEK - if you notice any information here to be missing or incorrect, please let us know! When possible, please include a source URL (we verify all data prior to inclusion).

Report issue