Active Ingredient History

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Vitamin K refers to structurally similar, fat-soluble vitamers found in foods and marketed as dietary supplements. The human body requires vitamin K for post-synthesis modification of certain proteins that are required for blood coagulation or for controlling binding of calcium in bones and other tissues. The complete synthesis involves final modification of these so-called "Gla proteins" by the enzyme gamma-glutamyl carboxylase that uses vitamin K as a cofactor. The presence of uncarboxylated proteins indicates a vitamin K deficiency. Carboxylation allows them to bind (chelate) calcium ions, which they cannot do otherwise. Without vitamin K, blood coagulation is seriously impaired, and uncontrolled bleeding occurs. Research suggests that deficiency of vitamin K may also weaken bones, potentially contributing to osteoporosis, and may promote calcification of arteries and other soft tissues.   Wikipedia
Organization Org Type FDA approvals Clinical Trials involvement Org ID Force Sort
  • Highest Phase: Phase 4
  • # of Trials: 32
  • # of Trial Organizations: 35

  • Black Box: No
  • Availability: Prescription Only
  • Delivery Methods: Parenteral
  • Pro Drug: No
vitamin k

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